Spanish

10 Language Mistakes Guiris Make in Spanish

We all mistakes. We definitely all make mistakes when learning a foreign language. (Heck, we even make mistakes in our own language! Mario loves to point out when this happens to me in English.) These mistakes aren’t anything to be ashamed of; indeed, they are natural and fun ways to learn—if you have the right attitude! When I first got to Spain, I made a ton of mistakes. I swear, every other word that came out of my mouth was wrong! I’ve come a long way since I wrote on my Facebook wall that I was incapable of speaking Spanish properly.

Guiris make a lot of mistakes in Spanish. (I’m including myself among them!) This list is far from comprehensive; it’s just what first came to my mind. What sort of things do guiris like myself do wrong?

Cervantes Spanish Mistakes

We …

1. … conjugate verbs incorrectly.

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Great Spanish Slang to Make You Sound Like You Belong in Spain

I don’t know about you, but in my high school we learned Mexican/South-American Spanish. Now there’s nothing wrong with this (except for the part we totally skipped a tense [vosotros]), but when I decided to study abroad in Spain, I knew I wanted to learn Spain Spanish (Castilian Spanish). Only one problem: I didn’t know any Spaniards, nor had I entered the wonderful world of blogs. So I came to Spain in 2008 with very little knowledge of colloquial Castilian Spanish.

But you? No need to worry—I’ve got you covered. Here are some of my favorite ways to sound totally guay in Spain:

Es la caña

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Let’s Link—Week 3

Let's Link!

And we’re back with another link list! Sorry for the delay, but last weekend I was visiting Zamora and Mario’s family for the November 1 holiday, Todos los Santos, or All Saints’ Day in English. In Spain, families tend to visit the graveyards to put flowers on relatives’ graves. We had a merienda consisting of chocolate a la taza (basically melted chocolate, thick and delicious), chorizo, Zamoran cheese, fried bread, two kinds of cake, wine, and liqueurs. Other, more-widespread culinary traditions include eating Huesos de Santo (Saints’ Bones) and buñuelos de viento, which are filled with whipped cream, pastry cream, or chocolate.

Here are some of my favorite links from the past two weeks:

Do Different Languages Confer Different Personalities? Ah, a great question. I often feel more eloquent as well as funnier in English. In Spanish, I’m much less likely to express an opinion, because I find that it’s easier to quash. I also have a fear of looking silly, so this leads me to say less.

For Mind and Body: Study Finds Mediterranean Diet Boosts Both. For those of us living in Spain and consuming loads of olive oil, good news! The diet boosts both cerebral and physical health! I’m always happy to hear what I’m already doing is good for me.

The American Smile. I found this article, by fellow expat blogger (in Germany) Alex, to be hilarious and mind-opening. I never thought of this! Do Americans have a distinct smile? I know we smile a lot and especially on cue. But most of the time my smile is genuine; I’m not faking it. Also, I agree with Alex that flossing is not just made up by dentists. Flossing is totally important!

Recipe: Chorizo Burger with Paprika. It seems the UK has gone “mad” over chorizo, and this recipe just adds more evidence to the pile. A chorizo burger? Has the UK gone too far?

The Guiri Complex. What is really like to live in another country? Sometimes I get the picture that people think we live in a constant vacation world, that our lives are only filled with sunshine and rainbows. What is it like to miss things from the US? Should we always be searching those things out or treat them as what they are—a treat? Cat explores this question.

And now in Spanish …:

Esquelas curiosas publicadas en ABC. Esquelas are like death announcements, in which the family of the deceased puts a notice in the newspaper. The Spanish newspaper ABC recently published this article for Halloween of some of its more curious notices, including one that lamented that the deceased forgot to pass along a recipe for “pickled paella”!

Una docena de los nombres de chica más puestos en España. Recently I read about some of the most popular girls’ names in the US, and this article supplied what I’d wanted since: a list of the most-popular Spanish girls’ names. Obviously, María leads the list.

Thanks for reading! Any links you’d like to share?

So You’re Dating an American—Jorge

Wait, what? I thought this thing was the other way around? … You are right, my dear reader, you are right. But when one of my former interviewees, Kate, contacted me about doing a reverse interview, I thought, “Why not?” So I sent her boyfriend, Jorge, an interview, and he graciously filled it out for me. Kate blogs at Kate in Spain.

Now, I conducted the interview with Jorge in Spanish, because I believe writing/speaking in one’s native tongue allows one to be more forthright and expressive. So, I’ll be including his answers in Spanish and translating them as best I can.

Kate Jorge 1

¡Muchas gracias por hacer la entrevista! (Thank you for agreeing to do the interview!)

Por favor, preséntate. (Please introduce yourself.)

Hola! Me llamo Jorge y vivo en León. Soy profesor de música en un instituto de la ciudad y enseño violín por las tardes.

Hello! My name is Jorge and I live in León. I am a music teacher in a city high school and I teach violin in the afternoons.

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