Drinking Domus in Toledo

Put down that Mahou. Right now.

Mahou

I mean it. Put it down.

Newsflash for all you non-beer drinkers: Mahou, Spain’s most popular beer, is not that good. Most large-scale Spanish beer isn’t that good. (But never fear, Spain! Neither is large-scale U.S. beer.) For example: San Miguel, Estrella Damm, or Cruzcampo. (Cat, please don’t kill me for this statement, and I promise I will buy you all the Cruzcampo you want.) The one good thing it’s got going for it is that it’s refreshing. Mmm, watery beer. According to this review,

I can’t find anything that would distinguish it from a hundred others … Well, maybe one thing—it’s way too gassy for my liking … It’s refreshing enough if served ice cold and as it’s pretty inoffensive … bland even.

But good news, Spaniards and expats living in Spain! Not all is lost. The microbrewery craze is finally hitting Spanish shores (and inland, too). If you don’t know, a microbrewery is a brewery that produces beer on a small scale. For instance, in my favorite town of Bloomington, IN, a great microbrewery is Upland. In Madrid, there are several new(ish) breweries around. In Madrid, I have had La Cibeles and Lest.

But better than both of those was a beer I had this weekend while on a trip to Toledo:

Domus

Cervezas_DOMUS02

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Domus is a handcrafted beer from Toledo. The name Domus means “home” in Latin and refers to its homemade quality. On the beer’s logo you can see the two-headed eagle from Toledo’s coat of arms.

Domus was launched in 2009 in Toledo’s modest Santa Barbara neighborhood by Fernando Campoy. Campoy had been a beer fan from a young age, and the idea of launching his own company came to him about five years before he began Domus. Thus, he set out to learn and research by talking to different brewmasters from around the world and visiting microbreweries in order to learn and understand every possible detail of the process.

Mario and I tried two beers, the Regia and the Summa. However, we are excited to try more of the varieties soon!

Domus Regia

Domus Regia

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Domus Regia, Mario’s favorite, is a classic: everyone will like it. As a toasted and top-fermented beer, the roasted malt shines through. With 4.3% ABV, the Regia is a lovely shade of amber, and its turbid appearance is due to the yeast, which is suspended in the beer, as it is not filtered.

Given its smoothness and balance, this beer could accompany just about any meal or snack, as it is able to balance high-contrast foods as well as enhance the aromas and flavors of otherwise relatively bland foods (white fish, soft cheeses, etc.).

Domus Summa

Domus Summa

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Domus Summa, my favorite, is not for the faint of heart or for those who don’t like beer. Its higher alcohol content (7.2% ABV) makes it a rather more complex beer than the Regia. The Summa is brewed with roasted malt, but it’s the touch of honey that gives it a subtle sweetness in both its aroma and taste. Its style could be compared to the Belgian abbey ales. It’s also darker than its sister beer, more of a dark-brown burgundy shade.

Unlike the Belgian abbey ales, however, the Summa is not quite as full bodied as one would expect. It is, perhaps surprisingly, quite easy to drink despite its 7.2% ABV. It would go quite well with strongly flavored dishes, like jamón or chorizo, stews, or red meat—not to mention chocolate!

Domus Aurea

Domus Aurea

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Domus Aurea, which we did not try, is an India Pale Ale (IPA). In the 19th century, the English found themselves in need of a beer that would last the whole voyage from England to India. Thus, they came up with a beer with lots of hops and alcohol, which allowed the beers to stay good on the long journey. Nonetheless, the Aurea has rather lower levels of hops and bitterness than a typical IPA. Its scent is very spicy, with the hops being very present. Its lightweight body and carbonation make it a beer that is very easy to drink.

As with Regia, it can be enjoyed with a variety of dishes, from fresh cheeses to desserts.

Domus Greco

Domus Greco

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Domus is also launching a beer for the fourth centenary of El Greco. If you don’t know, El Greco (literally “The Greek”), was born in Greece and resided in both Venice and Rome, but he set up shop in Toledo in 1577, spending the rest of his life there. In that time, Toledo was the religious capital of Spain and one of the greatest cities in Europe. El Greco painted some of his best and most famous pieces there, including El entierro del señor de Orgaz (in English: The Burial of the Count of Orgaz).

Where Can I Find It?

Unfortunately, I think that Domus is only available in the Toledo area or online (with high shipping costs to boot!), so it’s not easily accessible. Nonetheless, if you happen to visiting Toledo for a weekend—it’s a great day trip from Madrid!—stop by one of the many establishments that sell it and enjoy un tercio (33 centiliters) or una caña (draft, smaller portion).

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29 comments

  1. I was going to make a case for Cruzcampo, but you beat me to it! In all fairness, it’s pretty much all that’s served in Seville, so I’ve learned to love it. Still, my top picks are Estrella Galicia and Alhambra Especial! Will have to see if they sell Domus at the Alcampo, yum!

  2. I love seeing unique topics like this featured in the expat blogosphere – it’s a welcome change from the usual ‘top 10 x’. I will definitely have to try some Domus when I return to Spain!

  3. BEER! Yes, awesome post. Beer in Spain is generally pretty awful, and I like PBR so that’s saying a lot. Now that you’re in Madrid, have you tried La Cibeles? If not, you should try and find some (El Corte Ingles in Plaza Callao has it, and I know the bar El Circo on Calle Corredera Baja de San Pablo sells it too). It’s a Madrid-local beer and they’ve got several different choices, not like Mahou where you get the green can or the red can as options.

      1. It’s too bad you just posted this because I was in Toledo about 3 weeks ago and I would have looked for it. I love La Cibeles and if you say Domus is better I’ll have to take your word for it!

  4. And, the 2nd annual Beer Festival was held in Barcelona this month! I went (of course) and there were EXCELLENT microbrews from all over Spain. Cat, there are a bunch of small breweries in Andalucia! Check it out! I don’t actually like IPA, but I am excited about all the stouts now on tap around Barcelona. Of course, I’m always a wino first, beer-drinker second!

    1. Wine will always be favorite as well. I don’t know if I like IPAs either, as I’ve not had that many. I prefer the Summa type, dark with lots of flavor!

  5. Great tip, Kaley! Andres and I have been exploring some of the craft beer places in Madrid but I wasn’t aware of this gem in Toledo. I will have to remember this when my parents come in the summer, as a trip to Toledo is on the menu.

  6. I’m with you on Mahou. That stuff is awful (sorry Cat), there is a reason Spain is not known for its beers. Because they simply are not good!

    I’m not surprised to hear the local stuff is better, in general it tends to be. I’m not a huge beer drinker myself, but I do appreciate a cana from time to time. My own father used to brew beer in our kitchen for awhile–I hated when he did because it made the house smell awful! Great post, maybe someday the Toledo Domus beer will become more widely available?

  7. Too bad it’s only available in Toledo, that sounds great. I have seen lots of new craft beer places in Barcelona though, so it seems to be picking up.

    I do actually like Estrella beers, especially the dark Voll Damn, so that’s another one for the regionalisms!

    P.S. One good thing about Mahou is that 100 Montaditos will give you a whole jarra for €1, which is practically unheard of in Barcelona.

  8. This sounds interesting…and delicious! I love abbey ales, so the Domus Summa sounds extra tasty. Too bad I’m so far from Toledo. Will have to keep this in mind the next time I’m headed up to Madrid. Until then, it’s Cruzcampo for me!

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